Why Every Pregnant Mum Needs to Join a VBAC Facebook Group

Untitled designCongratulations! You’re expecting! Maybe it’s your first, maybe it’s your last, but there’s so much you can learn from joining a VBAC Support Group on Facebook.

Firstly, What does VBAC stand for? VBAC stands for “Vaginal Birth After C-Section,” and it is a term used for women with previous cesarean deliveries but want to birth vaginally with subsequent children. For some VBAC women, they’ve only had one previous c-section delivery and two or three other vaginal births. Other VBAC women may have had multiple cesarean deliveries and are looking to have their first, or another vaginal birth. These women sometimes identify as a variation of VBA2C (for 2 previous cesareans) or HBA3C (Home Birth After 3 C-Sections), and there are many more variations.

Secondly, Why Am I Supporting Joining a VBAC Group Especially if You’re a First Time Mum? I have never had a c-section, and I am not expecting another baby yet; however, I am in several VBAC groups on Facebook. Thankfully, VBAC support groups are open to birth workers and anyone who supports vaginal birth. The significance of VBAC mums are that they have EXPERIENCED c-sections, they have EXPERIENCED vaginal births, and they have EXPERIENCED the kind of treatment received by doctors and midwives, often pushing them to do a lot of research, take proper antenatal birthing classes such as Bradley classes, and stick to their guns.

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9 Things that can lead to Failure to Progress (FTP)

woman-in-labourWhat is Failure to Progress? According to doctors and midwives, Failure to Progress is also known as Prolonged Labour, when labour lasts for approximately 20 hours or more after regular contractions begin, and approximately 14 hours or more if you’ve given birth previously. Prolonged latent phase happens during first stage labour where mother can get exhausted and emotionally drained, and prolonged labour during second stage can be a “cause for concern.”

According to WebMD, Prolonged labour may happen if:

  • The baby is very big and cannot move through the birth canal. (Cephalopelvic disproportion)
  • The baby is in an abnormal position. Normally, the baby is head-down facing your back. (Posterior presentation: back-to-back)
  • The birth canal is too small for the baby to move through. (Android pelvis, narrow pelvis)
  • Your contractions are very weak. (Inefficient contractions)

NOW HERE’S the HARD PART. Scratch everything that I just stated up there and everything that you hear from doctors and midwives. Remember, they’re a part of a system, either hospital, birth centre, or NHS and they need to be able to put mothers on a schedule, a timeline, and checklist, so they can do their job. Continue reading