Bradley Method® Certification Process

I am thrilled to announce that after a two-year certification period, I am now fully affiliated as a Bradley Method® Natural Childbirth Educator!

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My journey towards becoming an active birth educator began as a Bradley student while expecting my first child. My husband and I were eager students and very enthusiastic about having a natural and unmedicated childbirth. We were so eager that we even decided to forgo the hospital and have our baby at home by a  Certified Professional Midwife. The twelve weeks of classes were so informative and empowering, the labour was very short (five hours!) and the birth was amazing. I remember when the midwife helped lift my daughter up out of the water and onto my chest that my baby’s arms were up, outstretched for me, and I held her against my upper abdomen, for the umbilical cord was quite short, and was an awe that I had birthed this beautiful baby, in my own home, with my own strength, without drugs! Continue reading

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Why Every Pregnant Mum Needs to Join a VBAC Facebook Group

Untitled designCongratulations! You’re expecting! Maybe it’s your first, maybe it’s your last, but there’s so much you can learn from joining a VBAC Support Group on Facebook.

Firstly, What does VBAC stand for? VBAC stands for “Vaginal Birth After C-Section,” and it is a term used for women with previous cesarean deliveries but want to birth vaginally with subsequent children. For some VBAC women, they’ve only had one previous c-section delivery and two or three other vaginal births. Other VBAC women may have had multiple cesarean deliveries and are looking to have their first, or another vaginal birth. These women sometimes identify as a variation of VBA2C (for 2 previous cesareans) or HBA3C (Home Birth After 3 C-Sections), and there are many more variations.

Secondly, Why Am I Supporting Joining a VBAC Group Especially if You’re a First Time Mum? I have never had a c-section, and I am not expecting another baby yet; however, I am in several VBAC groups on Facebook. Thankfully, VBAC support groups are open to birth workers and anyone who supports vaginal birth. The significance of VBAC mums are that they have EXPERIENCED c-sections, they have EXPERIENCED vaginal births, and they have EXPERIENCED the kind of treatment received by doctors and midwives, often pushing them to do a lot of research, take proper antenatal birthing classes such as Bradley classes, and stick to their guns.

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Why the Bradley Method®? This is my story.

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I’m a natural childbirth educator. I never thought that I would become an advocate for women in their most vulnerable and their strongest moments–pregnancy and childbirth! So as I meet and talk to more and more mothers, I feel so lucky that I had my natural childbirth experience with my first child. I didn’t have to go through a traumatising forceps delivery, or an emergency c-section, to look more into birth and end up discovering what and how to achieve a natural and drug-free childbirth. I didn’t have to jump through hoops like VBAC candidates do to attempt a natural childbirth. My shot at a natural birth was more straight-forward and easier than those who had their first child via a traumatising experience. Continue reading

Does Induction Really REDUCE C-Section Risk?

induction-training1Several weeks ago, I came across a claim that Induction reduces the risk of C-section! I sincerely thought, this must be a joke; however, it was referencing an actual journal publication. You can find the actual publication here.

Since I’ve always heard people say, “I had to be induced, and then it ended in c-section,” I thought I would do a series of polls to see if there was any indication that induction REDUCED the number of c-sections.

First, I did a poll directed to those mothers who ended up with emergency c-sections to see how many of them received drugs to induce. You can find the results here“If your birth ended in an emergency c-section, were you given any drugs to start labour or speed up labour prior to the need for a c-section?” Results: 68% Yes to 32% No.  Continue reading

C-sections: Are They Necessary for Every 1 in 4 Women in the UK?

An overwhelming majority of people I meet who have had c-sections are so grateful that they were able to get their baby out safely. They say that if it weren’t for them, they might be dead or their baby might be dead. However, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), caesarean sections should only be performed when medically necessary – no more than about 10%-15% of all births. So what about the 10% of women who are still getting c-sections in the UK, but they aren’t medically necessary? Why does it seem like the c-section rate is growing still? Women are still getting unnecessary c-sections and I think it’s due to lack of knowledge and preparation. Doctors tell every c-section patient that it was medically necessary, but that’s not what the statistics show.

Unfortunately, the doctors tell c-section patients a reason to justify the need for the c-section. I’m going to list a couple of common reasons given for c-sections and why they are not valid reasons for this major abdominal surgery.  Continue reading

How to Avoid Fetal Distress (and a C-Section)

Live-Tweeted-C-SectionIs this even possible? Yes. Today, “fetal distress” is a leading cause for a c-section. So how can it be avoided?

How to Avoid Fetal Distress

1. Refuse EFM, Electronic Fetal Monitoring. This is your birth. This should be your choice. Many hospitals may ‘require’ you to be monitored using EFM; however, you have the choice to refuse! If you don’t have to guts to refuse a health professional, then I advise hiring a doula to speak for you. Why is this important? There is significant data that shows the increased risk of c-section with an increase of EFM use. Here’s a quote from the 2005 Practice Bulletin #70 of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists:

“Despite its widespread use, there is controversy about the efficacy of EFM. Moreover, there is evidence that the use of EFM increases the rate of cesarean and operative vaginal deliveries. Given that the available data do not clearly support the use of EFM over intermittent ausculation, either option is acceptable in a patient without complications.” (Obstetrics and Gynecology, Intrapartum Fetal Heart-Rate Monitoring 106 (6), 1463-1561.)

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