Do You Have to be a Duchess to Get the Birth You Want?

Royal-BabyOn 2nd May 2015, the nation celebrated the birth of the Princess of Cambridge, Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana! What was on everyone’s minds at the presentation of the baby just 10 hours after birth? How did Kate look so good?

Daily Mail’s “Call the Midwife” article stated,

Kate had a meticulous birth plan. She had opted to be seen first by the midwives, and as a source said: ‘What the duchess wants, the duchess gets.’

I’d venture to say, WHAT THE MOTHER WANTS, THE MOTHER GETS! What’s the actual difference between Kate and mothers all around the world? Nothing! Does she have superhuman powers? Of course not! There was no special way she got that baby out of her body that other mothers don’t have. What she did have, though, is the midwives’, doctors’, and Wills’ RESPECT to do what she wished regarding her birth. Every mother deserves this kind of respect, to be treated like a duchess at the time of labour and birth.

If a Duchess can have the birth she wants, can you? Yes! Here’s how: Continue reading

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Results for This Week’s Poll: If you received drugs to induce, what was your delivery method?

Check out the results from this week’s poll about drugs and delivery method! 47% ended delivering vaginally, 26% delivered with forceps or vacuum extraction, and 26% had an emergency c-section. None had a schedule c-section after receiving drugs and there was one vote that entered a different answer.  She entered, “Vaginal birth with manual assistance whilst being prepped for an emergency c/s” which would go into the category of “Vaginal with forceps or vacuum extraction.”

Therefore, the results would have been: 47% vaginal only, 27% vaginal with manual assistance, 26% emergency c-section.

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What does this poll mean? I can’t make any conclusions from this data since I don’t know the background information from the voters. It does show that if you receive drugs to start or speed up labour, that your chance of having an emergency c-section is 26%. However, this sampling is small with only 152 votes. Some could be multigravida and others primigravida. It also shows that if you choose to use drugs to induce, you still have almost a 50/50 chance to birth vaginally without assistance. This is great news! In order to conclude that receiving drugs to start or speed up labour increases or decreases your likelihood of having a c-section, I would have to know what is the likelihood of c-section from mothers who did not receive drugs to induce labour. This is my next poll.

How to Avoid Fetal Distress (and a C-Section)

Live-Tweeted-C-SectionIs this even possible? Yes. Today, “fetal distress” is a leading cause for a c-section. So how can it be avoided?

How to Avoid Fetal Distress

1. Refuse EFM, Electronic Fetal Monitoring. This is your birth. This should be your choice. Many hospitals may ‘require’ you to be monitored using EFM; however, you have the choice to refuse! If you don’t have to guts to refuse a health professional, then I advise hiring a doula to speak for you. Why is this important? There is significant data that shows the increased risk of c-section with an increase of EFM use. Here’s a quote from the 2005 Practice Bulletin #70 of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists:

“Despite its widespread use, there is controversy about the efficacy of EFM. Moreover, there is evidence that the use of EFM increases the rate of cesarean and operative vaginal deliveries. Given that the available data do not clearly support the use of EFM over intermittent ausculation, either option is acceptable in a patient without complications.” (Obstetrics and Gynecology, Intrapartum Fetal Heart-Rate Monitoring 106 (6), 1463-1561.)

Continue reading