Does Induction Really REDUCE C-Section Risk?

induction-training1Several weeks ago, I came across a claim that Induction reduces the risk of C-section! I sincerely thought, this must be a joke; however, it was referencing an actual journal publication. You can find the actual publication here.

Since I’ve always heard people say, “I had to be induced, and then it ended in c-section,” I thought I would do a series of polls to see if there was any indication that induction REDUCED the number of c-sections.

First, I did a poll directed to those mothers who ended up with emergency c-sections to see how many of them received drugs to induce. You can find the results here“If your birth ended in an emergency c-section, were you given any drugs to start labour or speed up labour prior to the need for a c-section?” Results: 68% Yes to 32% No.  Continue reading

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If You Eat Paleo, You Should Birth Naturally

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My husband and I have been eating a paleo diet/lifestyle since we were engaged. It not only helped us lose a total of 40 lbs put together for the wedding, but it also changed the way we think about our health. The philosophy behind the paleo diet is can be found here and Mark’s Daily Apple‘s blog is an excellent resource on how to get started. Here’s also an overview of the history of food and what this diet is based on. Also, here’s a short video by Mama Natural, who I enjoy watching, and her first week of the Paleo diet!

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Never Heard of the Bradley Method®? It’s new to the UK!

If you’re wondering what the Bradley Method® is, here’s a link to babycenter.com for a good overview!

I’ve taken the liberty of copying and pasting its contents below. I encourage you to check out the comments underneath the article by babycenter.com and see for yourself how good the classes are for you to achieve the best possible birth!

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What is the Bradley method of childbirth?

This method embraces the idea that childbirth is a natural process and that, with the right preparation, most women can avoid pain medication and routine interventions during labor and birth. It’s named after American obstetrician Robert Bradley, who developed the method in the late 1940s. Continue reading